Coronavirus (COVID-19): More than 381,400 cases and 16,557 deaths in more than 160 countries

Health workers in Wuhan, China

At the start of December 2019, a new virus appeared in the city of Wuhan, China that has pulled public health experts from around the world to understand, track, and control it.

Update: World Health Organization (WHO) declared Novel Coronavirus (COVID19) as Pandemic.

Update: Italy announced lockdown in the whole country, USA announced COVID19 a National Emergency

Latest Updates about COVID-19:

ChinaGlobalTotal
Confirmed Cases81,545299,954381,499
Deaths3,27613,28116,557
Recovered72,84128,953101,794

Real-time report available here

Fatality Rate of COVID-19:

Age GroupDeath Rate with confirmed cases
0-9 years oldNo Fatalities
10-19 years old0.2%
20-29 years old0.2%
30-39 years old0.2%
40-49 years old0.4%
50-59 years old1.3%
60-69 years old3.6%
70-79 years old8.0%
80+ years old14.8%

Where did it come from?

In late December 2019, Health officials from China informed the World Health Organization that they are having a problem in controlling an unknown virus that was causing pneumonia-like illness in the city of Wuhan and soon it was found out that the virus is Coronavirus and is spreading rapidly inside and outside of the city.

Coronaviruses are commonly seen in animals but sometimes these viruses evolves and affects humans. In SARS outbreak 2002 and MERS outbreak 2012 coronavirus were found to be the reason behind the illness.

In early stages of research, scientists have found that the virus first affected the humans in a seafood market in Wuhan and spread from there. One team of researchers in China reported that the virus has come from snakes, based on the genetic code of the virus and another analysis found that the genetic sequence of the newfound virus is 96 percent similar to one coronavirus found in bats.

Both SARS and MERS originated in bats.

How Dangerous is this new virus?

There is no official statement of the fatality rate of this new virus, symptoms found in infected patients have ranged from mild to severe. Currently, the fatality rate is said to be 4 percent but it could change (Fatality rate was about 14 to 15 percent in SARS outbreak).

It has been noted that the virus might have spread from a sick person to other family members or health workers.

CountryConfirmed CasesDeaths
Worldwide306,39513,031
China81,3343,261
Italy53,5784,825
USA26,138323
Spain22,4961,381
Germany22,36484
Iran20,6101,556
France14,485562
South Korea8,897102
Switzerland6,65280
United Kingdom5,067233
Netherlands3,640136
Belgium2,81567
Austria2,8148
Norway2,1647
Sweden1,77020
Denmark1,42013
Portugal1,28012
Canada1,27819
Malaysia1,1838
Australia1,0717
Japan1,05535
Brazil1,02118
Czechia9950
Turkey94721
Israel8831
Ireland7853
Pakistan7333
Diamond Princess Cruise Ship7127
Luxembourg6708
Chile5371
Poland5365
Ecuador5327
Greece53013
Finland5231
Qatar4810
Iceland4730
Indonesia45038
Singapore4322
Thailand4111
Saudi Arabia3920
Slovenia3831
Romania3670
India3324
Peru3185
Philippines30719
Russia3061
Estonia3060
Bahrain3051
Egypt29410
Panama2453
South Africa2400
Lebanon2304
Iraq21417
Hong Kong2084
Croatia2061
Mexico2031
Colombia1960
Slovakia1781
Kuwait1760
Serbia1711
Bulgaria1633
Armenia1600
Argentina1583
UAE1532
Taiwan*1532
San Marino14420
Algeria13915
Latvia1240
Costa Rica1172
Dominican Republic1123
Uruguay1100
Hungary1034
Lithuania991
Jordan990
Morocco963
Vietnam940
Bosnia & Herzegovina931
Andorra880
North Macedonia850
Cyprus841
Brunei830
Moldova801
Sri Lanka770
Albania762
Belarus760
Malta730
Venezuela700
Burkin Faso643
Tunisia601
Senegal560
Guadeloupe560
Cambodia530
Kazakhstan533
Azerbaijan531
New Zealand520
Oman520
Georgia490
Trinidad & Tobago490
Ukraine473
Reunion450
Uzbekistan430
Liechtenstein370
Martinique370
Cameroon270
Bangladesh252
Palestine*250
Afghanistan240
Honduras240
Congo (Kinshasa)231
Nigeria220
Paraguay221
Cuba211
Ghana211
Bolivia190
French Guiana181
Guatemala171
Macau170
Rwanda170
Jamaica161
Montenegro160
Togo160
Mauritius141
Barbados140
Cote d'Ivoire140
Kyrgystan140
Maldives130
Monaco110
Mayotte110
Mongolia100
Ethiopia90
Guyana70
Kenya70
Seychelles70
Tanzania60
Equatorial Guinea60
Guam50
Suriname50
Gabon51
Aruba40
The Bahamas40
Puerto Rico30
Congo (Brazzaville)30
Namibia30
Madagascar30
Central African Republic30
Liberia30
Zimbabwe30
Cabo Verde30
El Salvador30
Faroe Islands20
St. Martin20
Jersey20
Kosovo20
Zambia20
Saint Lucia20
Sudan21
Benin20
Mauritania20
Haiti20
Bhutan20
Nicaragua20
Saint Barthelemy10
Nepal10
Gibraltor10
Vatican City10
Channel Islands10
Holy See10
Cayman Islands11
Antigua & Barbuda10
French Polynesia10
Guernsey10
Eswatini10
Saint Vincent & the Grenadines10
Curacao11
Republic of the Congo10
Greenland10
Somalia10
The Gambia10
Djibouti10
Niger10
Chad10
Papua New Guinea10
Angola10
Fiji10
East Timor10
Eritea10
Timor-Leste10

Note: The numbers given in table may vary

SARS outbreak counted for 774 deaths worldwide, while the MERS outbreak counted for 525 deaths worldwide (453 in Saudi Arabia).

How China is controlling the Virus spreading?

As of now at least eleven cities of China (Wuhan, Ezhou, Huanggang, Chibi, Xiantao, Zhijiang, Qianjjiang, Huangshi, Xianning, and Yichang) are under some degrees of lockdown means all form of transportation in the cities for about 30 million people has been restricted.

Construction of a new specialized hospital with 1,000 beds for patients completed within February 3. The new hospital will be built on the same model which was built in seven days in Beijing during the SARS outbreak in 2003.

Another 1,600-bed specialized makeshift hospital constructed in Wuhan and 1,230 doctors and nurses have been deployed to help fight coronavirus with private firms including Tencent, JD.com, and Lenovo pledge for financial aid in dealing with the deadly outbreak.

Alibaba has donated 100 million yuan through his charitable foundation to help find a vaccine for the novel coronavirus. The Tencent Charity Foundation announced a donation of 300 million yuan to set up the first phase of a new pneumonia prevention and control fund.

Security software provider 360 Security Group donated 15 million yuan worth of medical supplies to Wuhan, Hubei province, to ensure the safety of front-line disease prevention staff and support rescue efforts.


Ten steps to protect yourself from Coronavirus

Here are 10 lessons — good and bad — from Asia on how to deal with a coronavirus outbreak.

1. Be transparent with the public. Government transparency and publicly accessible information can help educate citizens on the risks and necessary precautionary measures, and avoid panic or misinformation.

2. Conduct social distancing. The virus spreads when people are in close physical contact — so one of the most important preventative measures is social distancing. Countries across Asia have suspended schools, canceled public gatherings, and closed public spaces like swimming pools or libraries.

3. Be ahead of the game. In January, as it became clear that the virus was spreading rapidly across Asia, countries got ready by setting up quarantine centers, ordering more medical supplies in advance, and organizing cross-departmental government emergency response committees.

4. Get tested early. Countries can encourage early testing, and make testing available across local districts, to quickly identify the arrival of the virus. In South Korea, a smartphone app asks citizens to do a daily check of their symptoms, and the country has pioneered drive-through testing for the virus.

5. Spread good hygiene practices. Simple measures can go a long way — like washing your hands properly and frequently, covering your nose or mouth when you cough or sneeze, and being conscious of the surfaces you touch.

6. Offer employees flexible working arrangements. Millions of people in Asia have been working from home, or working more flexible hours, for several weeks — made possible by modern technology. This reduces the risk of infection and helps employees feel safer.

7. Don’t panic buy. Panic buying, as seen in Hong Kong and elsewhere, stokes unnecessary chaos and fear. It takes away critical supplies for front liners and health care workers — and often, the supply chains are just fine.

8. Don’t be afraid of your pets. There are no evidence pets can catch the virus and subsequently infect you. The virus can live on surfaces and objects — so it could be present on the surface of a dog or cat, like how it might be present on an elevator button or door handle.

9. Don’t stigmatize patients. As the virus spreads, so does fear and discrimination. Experts have warned against stigmatizing patients; for instance, if quarantines aren’t done properly, patients could potentially be treated with less dignity and respect.

10. Finally — don’t panic. Based on currently available data, the virus is thought to have a fatality rate of about 2% — that’s higher than influenza, which is about 0.1%, but much lower than severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) at 9.6%, and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) at 35%. For many people, symptoms are just like those of common cold and may go away on their own.

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