SpaceX breaks ISRO’s record by carrying 143 satellites to the space with Transporter-1 Mission

SpaceX Transporter-1 Mission

SpaceX successfully completed the “Transporter-1” rideshare mission carrying and deploying 143 satellites to the space using the Falcon 9 rocket from the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station at 10 a.m. EST on Sunday.

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket carried payloads from Planet, Swarm Technologies, Kepler Communications, Spire, Capella Space, ICEYE, NASA, and a host of other customers from 11 countries that ranged from CubeSats to microsatellites weighing several hundred pounds.

This launch broke the record set by ISRO’s PSLV rocket in 2017 that carried 104 satellites in a single launch.

The stack of 143 small satellites aboard SpaceX’s Transporter-1 mission before encapsulation inside the Falcon 9 rocket’s payload shroud
The stack of 143 small satellites aboard SpaceX’s Transporter-1 mission before encapsulation inside the Falcon 9 rocket’s payload shroud. Image: SpaceX

List of all 143 satellites launched on the Transporter-1 mission:

  • 48 SuperDove satellites for Planet
  • 36 SpaceBEE satellites for Swarm
  • 10 Starlink satellites for SpaceX
  • 8 GEN1 satellites for Kepler
  • 8 Lemur-2 satellites for Spire
  • 5 Astrocast satellites
  • 3 HawkEye 360 satellites
  • 3 ICEYE satellites
  • 3 V-R3x satellites for NASA
  • 3 ARCE-1 satellites for the University of South Florida
  • 2 Capella satellites
  • Sherpa-FX space tug for Spaceflight
  • D-Orbit’s ION SCV Laurentius space tug
  • iQPS-2 for iQPS (Japan)
  • YUSAT for Taiwan’s Ministry of Science and Technology
  • IDEASSAT for Taiwan’s Ministry of Science and Technology
  • UVQS-SAT for LATMOS (France)
  • ASELSAT for ASELSAN (Turkey)
  • Hiber Four for Hiber (Netherlands)
  • SOMP2b for TU Dresden (Germany)
  • PIXL-1 for DLR (Germany)
  • Charlie for U.S.-based Aurora Insight
  • Hugo for GHGSat (Canada)
  • PTD-1 for NASA
  • Prometheus for Los Alamos National Laboratory

The success of this launch mission makes SpaceX’s entry to carrying larger satellites to the orbit that starts at $1 million for the first 485 pounds.

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